Extracting the WiFi Firmware and Putting Back a Keylogger

Extracting the WiFi Firmware and Putting Back a Keylogger

In the interest of simplification or abstraction, we like to think of the laptop on the kitchen table as a single discrete unit of processing. In fact, there is a surprisingly large number of small processors alongside the many cores that make up the processor. [8051enthusiast] dove into the Realtek rtl8821ae WiFi chip on his laptop and extracted the firmware. The Realtek rtl8821ae chip is a fairly standard Realtek chip as seen in this unboxing (which is where the main image comes from).

True to his name, [8051enthusiast] was pleased to find that the rtl8821ae was clearly based on the Intel 8051. The firmware was loaded on startup from a known file path and loaded onto the chip sitting in an M.2 slot. Careful consideration, [8051enthusiast] reasoned that the firmware was using RTX51 Tiny, which is a small real-time kernel.

The firmware is loaded at 0x4000 but it calls to code below that address, which means there is a ROM on the chip that contains some code. The easiest way to extract it would be to write some custom code that just copies the masked ROM back to the main CPU via the shared memory-mapped config space, but the firmware is checksummed by the masked ROM code. However, the checksum is just a 16-bit XOR. With a tweak in the kernel to allow accessing the shared config space from userspace, [8051enthusiast] was on his way to a complete firmware image.

Next, [8051enthusiast] looked at what could be done with his newfound hackability. The keyboard matrix is read by the Embedded Controller (EC), which happens to be another 8051 based microcontroller. There also happens to be an RX and a TX trace from the EC to the m.2 slot (where the rtl8821ae is). This has to do with 0x80 postcodes from the processor being routed out somewhere accessible via the EC. With a bit of custom code on both the EC and the WiFi chip, [8051enthusiast] had a keylogger that didn’t run on the main processor broadcasting the PS/2 keystrokes as UDP packets.

Of course, there are plenty of other 8051 based devices out there just waiting to be discovered. Like this 8051 based e-ink display controller.

[Main image source: Realtek RTL8821AE unboxing on YouTube by Евгений Горохов]

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